Recipe: Honeysuckle Jelly – Childhood Memories In A Jar

by Tammy Taylor

Here  in NE Texas the honeysuckle is blooming.  Aaaahhh sweet childhood memories of my siblings and me standing around a honeysuckle vine under that blue sky, pulling the fragrant flowers and sucking the sweet honey from the blooms. I decided to make honeysuckle jelly so I could taste those wonderful memories.

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

I have very limited honeysuckle vines here on the ranch, but thankfully my mother has a bumper crop.  So I harvested about 4 cups of honeysuckle flowers at her house and brought them home.  First I took each flower and cut the tiny green bulb from the base of each of the blooms.  This leaves only the petals and the honey.

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

After rinsing the blossoms in a colander I boiled 4 cups of water in a large saucepan and removed the pan from the heat.  I added the honeysuckle flowers and replaced the cover on the pan.  I allowed the blossoms to steep for about 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes or so.  This makes a blossom infusion.  Breathe deeply and smell that wonderful aroma…

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

I strained the petals from the water and set aside the petals for my compost.  In my saucepan I returned two cups of the blossom infusion, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 4 cups of sugar and stirred until the sugar was dissolved.  I should caution here that trying to double the recipe can result in failure of the mixture to jell properly.  If you want to save the extra infusion and make more jelly, put it aside and do one batch at a time, don’t try to do a double batch now.  I don’t know why this keeps the jelly from thickening, but it very well could do that.  In that case instead of jelly you will have “Honeysuckle Honey” – still delicious just not thick.  Ask me how I know…  Eh hem!

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

Although it wasn’t in the recipe I added a couple of teaspoons of citrus zest to the mixture, I just wanted a little zesty-zip.  Then I turned the heat on medium high and brought the infusion to a boil.  I brought it to a hard boil that could not be stirred down, added the pectin and set the timer for two minutes.  After the infusion boiled those two minutes I removed the pan from the heat.  The hot jelly was ladled into hot sterilized half-pint canning jars, the rim of each jar was wiped clean of any drips and I placed a two-part canning lid/ring onto each jar, tightening only until medium snug.

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

I placed the jars of jelly into my water-bath canner and lowered them into the boiling water completely covering the jars by 1″ and placed the lid on the canner.  After the water returned to a rolling boil I set the timer for 5 minutes.

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

After the timer went off I carefully lifted the jars out of the canner and set them onto a tea towel to cool.  After 24 hours you can test the seal to make sure it sealed correctly by gently pressing the middle of the flat lid.  If it makes a plinky noise when pressed, the jar did not seal – put it in the fridge and consume the contents quickly.  All of mine sealed just fine.  These jars look like they contain summer sunshine, do they not?

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  #TaylorMadeRanch

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  Give it a try!

~TMR~

 

* * * * * * * * * *

Honeysuckle Jelly  –  Yields 7 half-pints

  • 4 cups honeysuckle flowers
  • 4 cups boiling water
  • 1/4 c. lemon juice
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 package liquid pectin

To make an infusion, prepare the flowers by removing the tiny green tip at the base of each blossom.

Next, bring 4 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan, turn the heat off, then add the honeysuckle blossoms, covering the pan after blooms are placed in water. Allow them to steep for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Strain the flowers from the liquid. Measure two cups of the infusion and return it to the saucepan.
Add lemon juice and sugar and turn heat to medium high, stirring constantly.  Bring the infusion to a hard boil that won’t stir down.

Add the pectin and boil for two minutes.  Reduce heat if necessary to avoid boiling over.

Ladle jelly into hot, sterilized jars, and screw on canning lids. Place jars in boiling water of a water-bath canner for 5 minutes. Remove jars and place on a towel, out of drafts and allow to cool for 24 hours.  After 24 hrs test the lids to make sure the jars are properly sealed

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87 thoughts on “Recipe: Honeysuckle Jelly – Childhood Memories In A Jar

  1. Terressa

    This is wonderful! I’ve never heard of anyone doing this. I’ve never made jelly, but I’m going to make this.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Terressa, give it a try – this jelly tastes just like enjoying a honeysuckle blossom right off the vine. ~TMR~

      Reply
  2. Linda @ A La Carte

    What a great recipe! I love Honeysuckle!! Thanks for sharing this at TTF this week! Linda and Diann

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Lois – now’s the time to gather the blossoms, honeysuckle blooms in the spring. You can prepare the blooms now and freeze them if you want to try making the jelly later in the year. ~TMR~

      Reply
  3. Nancy B.

    Reading the directions where you put the pectin in last really threw me for a loop, but when I read more carefully, I found that you were using liquid pectin. I usually use the powdered kind. I’ll have to give this a try. BTW, I live just north of Bug Tussle. Are you in Hunt County, or Fannin County?

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Nancy, I’ve been to Bug Tussle many times, I love the town. To answer your question, Wolfe City is in the very northern edge of Hunt County. Always nice to meet a neighbor! ~TMR~

      Reply
  4. Lynn H @ Turnips 2 Tangerines

    This jelly must taste Wonderful!! I have never tried to make jelly with Honeysuckle blossoms before! I have to add this to my list of jellies to make! Lynn @ Turnips 2 Tangerines

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Lynn, the jelly tastes exactly like I remember as a child enjoying the honey in those blossoms – give it a try! ~TMR~

      Reply
  5. Linda@With A Blast

    The jelly has to taste amazing! And the recipe seems simple enough to make {now, this might be “last words spoken”!} thank you for sharing at our All My Bloggy Friends Party !

    Reply
  6. Dana @ This Silly Girl's Life

    Great idea! I used to eat (?) honeysuckle when I was little! We would love it if you would link up at our linky party: Two Girls and a Party Live every Wednesday to Sunday. We hope to see you there!

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Give the jelly a try Dana, jelly is one of the easiest things to make and water-bath can. Thanks for the invite, I’ll “hop” right on over! ~TMR~

      Reply
  7. Bernideen's Tea Time Blog

    This is so unique. I too sucked the honeysuckle flowers as a child. My husband is quite allergic but I do think this is clever! I will print it out because later I will say “I wish I had”! I love to can and plan to take it up again in retirement! Would love to have you share this tomorrow at my “Open House”blog link party.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Thanks Bernideen – what a shame your hubby is allergic. The taste of this jelly is an amazing blast from childhood past – delicious. Thanks for the invite, I’ll see you then! ~TMR~

      Reply
  8. Marlo

    Interesting. I shall try it. Thanks for sharing your recipe. My husband has fond memories of honeysuckle in his grandfather’s garden. I think I will try this and give it to him for father’s day.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      OOooh Marlo, a Father’s Day gift – what a thoughtful & caring gesture. Love it! ~TMR~

      Reply
  9. Marlo

    by the way, can you make it into freezer jelly instead of canning it? email me and let me know, thanks!

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Marlo, I thought I’d answer you here in case someone else had the same question. I’ve never made freezer jam of any kind so I can’t say for sure if the recipes are interchangeable. I’ve always water-bath canned my jams and jellies because even though I now own a water-bath canner, you don’t HAVE to – a large stock pot big enough to cover the jars with an additional inch of water and a trivet to keep the jars from sitting on the bottom of the pot is all you need. I’ve even made my own canner-bottom trivet by tying canning jar rings together with cotton string. LOL. Can anyone else weigh in and answer Marlo’s question? ~TMR~

      Reply
  10. Lynn

    Wow, I loved that sweet drop of nectar from the honeysuckle bloom. I must try this! Thanks so much for sharing.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      (chanting from background) try it… try it… try it… LOL Lynn, it’s easy and so delicious, not to mention unusual – give it a try! ~TMR~

      Reply
  11. Rhonda

    I’m always looking for more unique jams/jelly recipes. This one certainly fits, I just wish we had honeysuckle around here. Have you previously posted any other jam or jelly recipes? I’d love to check them out. So far this year I’ve made dandelion jelly, Strawberry Basil jam, Smoky spice berry jam, mandarin orange marmalade, and this weekend I’m making apricot. Actually, it seems like it’s becoming a bit of an addiction, but that’s only because I enjoy it so much! :)

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Rhonda, adding recipes to my posts is a relatively recent addition so I don’t think I’ve featured any other jelly/jams. My other favorite jelly to make is with fruit from our wild plum trees – I was delighted with the results. Unfortunately the drought in 2011 took many of my beloved trees and the consecutive drought of 2012 weakened the remaining trees. I have seen a handful of blooms this year but I don’t think I’ll get a crop to make jelly. But I’ll be posting recipes here each Friday to send folks into the weekend with happy thoughts of good eatin’ so keep an eye out! ~TMR~

      Reply
  12. Anne Payne

    Looks fabulous and I love the smell of honeysuckle. I remember sucking on the blossoms as a child. We have an abundance of the stuff in our yard! I wonder if this would help with allergies, too. They say eating local honey does. Thanks for posting your recipe.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      I don’t think enjoying honeysuckle would help alleviate allergies like honey does, but what a delicious thing to do on a warm summer day! ~TMR~

      Reply
  13. Alison Bayne

    Thanks for sharing these detailed and clear instructions over at The Creative Home Acre Blog Hop. See you again at http://mumtopia.blogspot.com/2013/05/homeacrehop26thMay.html

    Reply
  14. Madge @ The View From Right Here

    Our wild honeysuckle has orange blossoms. Your jelly sounds heavenly… Thank you for joining in ‘Rurality Blog Hop #15′ Hope to see you next Wednesday for #16…

    Reply
  15. Pingback: The Creative HomeAcre Hop #17

  16. Katharina

    Thank you!!! Honeysuckle is one of my favorites and my kids are going to love picking the flowers! What a neat idea!

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Katharina, it’s been very well received as gifts as well since it’s so delicious and also because it’s an unusual idea. Give it a try! ~TMR~

      Reply
  17. Katharina

    All done already! :-) I think it may be that our honeysuckle time is almost over, or my lemon juice is too strong, or both, but I’ll use less lemon juice next time. For those like me that don’t have liquid pectin on hand – I found that one is supposed to use 6 tbsp of regular powdered pectin for one 3oz pouch of liquid. It’s quite infuriating that even in the Ball canning books and recipes, no conversion or amount in oz/tsp/tbsp is given…. but now I’m on a tangent :-) It looks like honey in jars. I’m baking some bread now….

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      That’s Awesome Katharina. I can speak from experience – it’s awesome with warm homemade bread fresh out of the oven! ;-) ~TMR~

      Reply
  18. Amanda @Natural Living Mamma

    Oh my goodness that sounds wonderful! I remember walking by honeysuckle trees and just sucking the honey out of them daily. They are beautiful. I need some now. Thanks so much for sharing on Natural Living Monday!

    Reply
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  20. Summers Acres

    We do not have any honeysuckles at the house. But we were out at the land we recently bought and there was some there. You’ve got me thinking now! Thanks for sharing! Please join us again Thursday at: The HomeAcre Hop ~Ann

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Ooh – recently bought land? How exciting Ann! If that were me I’d pick some of those blooms and have a very sentimental jar of jelly to enjoy… ~TMR~

      Reply
  21. Summers Acres

    Just stopping by to let you know that you are being featured tomorrow on The HomeAcre Hop. Come by and visit us again and grab the featured button. http://summersacres.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-homeacre-hop-21.html

    Reply
  22. Sue from theT2women

    Love this! There’s a new link-up party going on at One Sharendipity Place and we would love for you to join us! Here’s the link if you want to come: http://thet2women.com/welcome-to-one-sharendipity-place-link-up-4/

    Reply
  23. Rebecca from Who Needs a Cape?

    I love the smell of honey suckle but had never thought to make it into a jelly. Thanks for sharing it with us over on Who needs a Cape’s Super Sunday linky party.

    Reply
  24. Heather Who Needs a Cape?

    I have never tried honeysuckle but I might have to give it a whirl! Thanks for sharing at Super Sunday – hope to see you next week! http://whoneedsacape.com/2013/06/super-sunday-party-1/

    Reply
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  27. Laura Graham

    Our honeysuckle is over for this year. I thank you for the recipe, and I will try it next summer. They are so plentiful here in NE SC. I used to suck them up when I was a child. It seems like it would rinse out some of the ‘honey’ to rinse after cutting the green bottom off. I don’t think I will rinse at all. I came here from the clever chicks blog hop.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Well welcome Laura – glad you stopped by! I really should rinse the blossoms before I cut the tip off – I just wanted to wash off any debris from birds flying over, etc. LOL Next time I think I’ll rinse them first, let them air dry, then cut off the green bulb. Hummmm… ~TMR~

      Reply
  28. Sparkling74

    I do like the smell of honeysuckle and it’s always a surprise when it pops up in the breeze. I think I woud be overwhelmed with honeysuckle jelly though.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Honeysuckle *is* very fragrant and sweet smelling, and the jelly tastes just like it smells. We absolutely love it! ~TMR~

      Reply
  29. Cynthia L.

    I am on my way to find some honeysuckle. I have never heard of this jelly before. You make it sound very delicious though. Thanks for sharing at the In and Out of the Kitchen Link party. See you soon!

    Reply
  30. Marilyn

    I’ve never thought to make honeysuckle jelly! What an amazing and gourmet recipe! I LOVE IT! I’m currently hosting an awesome spice giveaway along with a “preserving the summer” recipe link party and I’d love for you to stop by and share this great recipe! http://www.4you-withlove.com/2013/08/party-thyme-preserving-summer-link.html Have a fabulous day! Marilyn

    Reply
  31. Kristin

    I love the smell of honeysuckle, but never thought of making it into a jelly! Such a great idea. Followed you from the Homestead Barn Hop. Love for you to come by Wildcrafting Wednesday and share. http://www.herbanmomma.com/2013/08/wildcrafting-wednesday-8-28-13/

    Reply
  32. SherryO

    This sounds amazing! I just love honeysuckle and imagine the jelly is divine! Thanks for sharing at Super Sunday Link Party at Who Needs A Cape? Be sure to stop back for more linky fun!

    Reply
  33. Mel

    Wow I did not know you could make jam from honeysuckles that’s amazing! Thanks so much for linking up at freaking awesome Fridays

    Reply
  34. Christina

    I loved honeysuckle as a kid!!! Thanks for linking up at the Thursday SWEET HAUTE Share linky party, hope you stop by every week! I really appreciate your support and encouragement . http://sweethaute.blogspot.com/2013/09/thursday-sweet-haute-share.html You still have time, the link is still open!!!! Be Sweet~ Christina at SWEET HAUTE

    Reply
  35. Kathy

    Looks beautiful and I’ll bet it tastes like a summer day! I am going to try it as soon as the honeysuckle starts blooming again. You can do the same thing with dandelions. Exact same recipe only using dandelion blossoms, taking care to take off all the bitter green parts. I found it easier to just nip off the blossoms with my fingernails as opposed to cutting them off. Strain through cheesecloth. Great project with the kiddos!

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      I had heard about making jelly out of dandelion blooms but I’ve never tried it – dandelions are in short supply here (I’ve never experienced THAT before! LOL) ~TMR~

      Reply
  36. Marilyn

    Sounds like a good jelly idea!! I just have some confusion about some of your methods….I have been making jelly for years. With all the sugar and citrus (acid) you are adding, I don’t think you have to put them in a boiling water bath at all. Follow the directions on the insert that comes with the pectin. Also, the instructions say to add the pectin with the mix early on, and when you bring that to a boil, then you add the sugar all at once and bring it to a second, hard boil for 1 minute. Then pour into clean sterilized jars, up to 1/8 inch from the top of the jar. The level in your jars is way below that. I also like the idea that they now suggest where you turn the jars upside down for 5 minutes after sealing them tightly. Sorry, I am not trying to be picky, don’t mean to offend you.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      No offense at all Marilyn. And yes, I learned to always over-size the pan I’m cooking my jelly in so it won’t boil over. I’ve read that you can turn sealed jars of hot jelly upside down and they would seal and I often do that when I’m making the jelly for just RancherMan & I. I guess I just want to be doubly safe if making for others. And I filled the jars to the levels that they all might be the same when I ran out of jelly in the pan instead of all full and one half full. WHEW! Think that covers everything. Thanks for your comments Marilyn! ~TMR~

      Reply
  37. Marilyn

    One more thing…if your jelly tends to boil over during the hard boil phase after adding the sugar, then you should use a deeper kettle, not reduce the heat. ;)

    Reply
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  39. ColleenB.~Texas

    I so enjoy making jams and jelly’s but have never heard of honeysuckle jelly before. Sounds rather interesting and would like to try and make a batch but…………….what I need is the honeysuckle. Thanks for the recipe along with good, detailed instructions. (I saved and printed out the recipe for future use……….just in case I come along and find some honeysuckle) Adding the recipe to my canning recipe binder. :}

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      We have precious little honeysuckle here as well Colleen, but thankfully my mom has a bumper crop. She was totally enamored with the jelly last year so she’s begged me to come make it this year at her house so she can learn how to do it too. I’m not gonna lie, it’s delicious! ~TMR~

      Reply
  40. villarosa

    Ah honeysuckle… takes me back to my grandmother’s farm & garden!! Thanks for sharing recipe. We do not use sugar, might you know if I could use a more natural sweetener for this recipe? Thank you for sharing! BTW, I love your blog. You are in our neck of the woods ~Smile….

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Well thank you for the compliment, and a big Howdy Neighbor from us! I only make the recipe as written and it works beautifully for me, but I’m assuming you can use any recipe that uses a blossom infusion. If you give it a try let me know how it turns out! ~TMR~

      Reply
  41. Nancy W

    I’ll be it tastes like sunshine in a jar! Thanks for sharing on the HomeAcre Hop! Love seeing your posts on the Hop! – Nancy The HomeAcre Hop

    Reply
  42. Wendy

    I was going to try to make some honeysuckle jelly. My family and I picked the honeysuckle, I boiled it, and let it sit in the refrigerator for a couple of days. When I tasted the water/juice, it had a not so good aftertaste. It almost tasted soapy, however, I’m sure I rinsed my container well. I was also afraid it would taste too much like perfume.

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Wow Wendy, that’s not anything like I experienced – it was absolutely DELICIOUS. Make sure to cut off all the tiny green bulbs at the end of each bloom before steeping in water. ~TMR~

      Reply
  43. Lois Baker

    I have got to try the honeysuckle jelly. Sounds delicious. I live down south with honeysuckle aplenty. Couple of questions: when your recipe calls for 1package liquid pectin are you using 1 envelope or 1 box of 2 envelopes? Does boiling the jelly for two minutes give you a soft set like jam or a firm set like jelly? Thanks

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Lois, I use 1 envelope and follow the directions. A couple of warnings – don’t try to double this recipe, it won’t set correctly for some reason when it’s doubled. I do save the leftover infusion and make two batches instead one double batch. And although it’s said there’s a way to use dry pectin in place of the liquid pectin I’ve never been successful with it. (I’m remaking a batch today because I tried again with the dry pectin because that’s what I had. sigh…) This recipe makes a pretty soft jelly so it’s easy to stir into yogurt or spread onto toast – I absolutely love it. Give ‘er a try & let me know how you like it. ~TMR~

      Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      I’ve never done so Rhonda, but I don’t see why you couldn’t make the infusion & freeze it for later. Can anyone weigh in on this question? ~TMR~

      Reply
  44. Jen

    You make it look so easy! I’ve never made any kind of jelly or canned good, but I want to try this. I have a ton of honeysuckle growing out in my yard and even the smell of it makes me happy!

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Jen, you’re Luh-KEY! The cows keep our vines eaten down, thankfully there’s plenty at my mom’s house only a short distance away. ~TMR~

      Reply
  45. Angela

    Hi! I love the idea of trying something like this! Do you have any ideas for someone living in the city who doesn’t have access to honeysuckle? Do you think the dried blossoms from the health food store would work or is there an infusion out there one could try?

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Actually Angela, most of the honeysuckle I’ve seen has been in the cities – people like to grow it along their fences. I’ve never heard of dried blossoms but I can’t imagine that would be very effective since it’s primarily that little drop of honey inside the fresh blooms that lends the sweet taste of childhood to this jelly. Maybe ask your family, friends or neighbors if they know anyone with honeysuckle vines? Believe me, it’s worth the effort. ~TMR~

      Reply
  46. Emi

    Hello, I would like to try this recipe, but I have very limited honeysuckle. Is it possible to freeze the blossoms until I can get 4 cups? Thank you, Emi

    Reply
    1. Taylor-Made RanchTaylor-Made Ranch Post author

      Hummm… I wouldn’t Emi, I don’t think the integrity of the blossoms will hold up to freezing/thawing to make a proper infusion. What I would do is make the infusion using the same (-ish) ratio and freeze the infusion until you get the quantity called for in the recipe. ~TMR~

      Reply
      1. Emi

        Thank you for the advice! I did as you said and made 1/2 the infusion and froze it… It was delicious and my family has been talking about it from the first taste! Luckily my honeysuckle vines bloomed again and I collected all the blossoms for another try :) I now have enough to last until next summer and a few for gifts! I will definitely be looking at your blog for more delicious recipes :)

        Reply
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